January 28, 2021

Whatever Floats Russia's Boats



Whatever Floats Russia's Boats
Getting ready to break the ice. Kremlin.ru (CC Fair Use)

Russia has seen a year of staggering accomplishments. As the first country to approve and release a Covid vaccination (with a namesake, no less, derived from the first satellite to achieve Earth orbit); the sequel to an internationally acclaimed assassination attempt; and the reveal of a massive palace on the Black Sea that, according to Russian Press Secretary Dmitry Peskov, “probably” exists “but what has the president got to do with it?” – you might be asking, “What else can go right for the Russian Federation?

It turns out that, with the abject failure of the Paris Agreement to slow climate change in the short-term, Russia might also be celebrating an economic boon.

The Russian ice-breaking tanker Cristophe de Margerie has managed to cross the Northern Sea Route, which is normally impassable at this time of year.

Transport Minister Vitaliy Savelyev has praised the feat, citing “a historical day for the development of the Northern Sea Route and national shipping” and “a step toward year-round commercial shipments on the route.”

If the Arctic ice keeps shrinking, Russia may well meet its goal of nearly doubling the tonnage of products shipped across the Northern Sea Route – from 80 to 130 million – by 2035.

Press Secretary Peskov is rumored to have commented that environmental degradation “probably” exists, “but what has Russia got to do with it?”

 

Arctic Wake-Up Call
  • July 01, 2020

Arctic Wake-Up Call

When environmentalists sounded the alarm this time about a spill of diesel fuel from a power station reserve tank near Nadezhda Metallurgical Plant, the government response was uncharacteristically serious.
Arctic Atlantis
  • June 21, 2019

Arctic Atlantis

On June 21, 1900, an intrepid explorer set off to find a mysterious Arctic island. He was never to be seen again.
Like this post? Get a weekly email digest + member-only deals

Some of Our Books

The Latchkey Murders

The Latchkey Murders

Senior Lieutenant Pavel Matyushkin is back on the case in this prequel to the popular mystery Murder at the Dacha, in which a serial killer is on the loose in Khrushchev’s Moscow...
Davai! The Russians and Their Vodka

Davai! The Russians and Their Vodka

In this comprehensive, quixotic and addictive book, Edwin Trommelen explores all facets of the Russian obsession with vodka. Peering chiefly through the lenses of history and literature, Trommelen offers up an appropriately complex, rich and bittersweet portrait, based on great respect for Russian culture.
The Samovar Murders

The Samovar Murders

The murder of a poet is always more than a murder. When a famous writer is brutally stabbed on the campus of Moscow’s Lumumba University, the son of a recently deposed African president confesses, and the case assumes political implications that no one wants any part of.
93 Untranslatable Russian Words

93 Untranslatable Russian Words

Every language has concepts, ideas, words and idioms that are nearly impossible to translate into another language. This book looks at nearly 100 such Russian words and offers paths to their understanding and translation by way of examples from literature and everyday life. Difficult to translate words and concepts are introduced with dictionary definitions, then elucidated with citations from literature, speech and prose, helping the student of Russian comprehend the word/concept in context.
Driving Down Russia's Spine

Driving Down Russia's Spine

The story of the epic Spine of Russia trip, intertwining fascinating subject profiles with digressions into historical and cultural themes relevant to understanding modern Russia. 
Murder and the Muse

Murder and the Muse

KGB Chief Andropov has tapped Matyushkin to solve a brazen jewel heist from Picasso’s wife at the posh Metropole Hotel. But when the case bleeds over into murder, machinations, and international intrigue, not everyone is eager to see where the clues might lead.
Fearful Majesty

Fearful Majesty

This acclaimed biography of one of Russia’s most important and tyrannical rulers is not only a rich, readable biography, it is also surprisingly timely, revealing how many of the issues Russia faces today have their roots in Ivan’s reign.
Woe From Wit (bilingual)

Woe From Wit (bilingual)

One of the most famous works of Russian literature, the four-act comedy in verse Woe from Wit skewers staid, nineteenth century Russian society, and it positively teems with “winged phrases” that are essential colloquialisms for students of Russian and Russian culture.
The Frogs Who Begged for a Tsar

The Frogs Who Begged for a Tsar

The fables of Ivan Krylov are rich fonts of Russian cultural wisdom and experience – reading and understanding them is vital to grasping the Russian worldview. This new edition of 62 of Krylov’s tales presents them side-by-side in English and Russian. The wonderfully lyrical translations by Lydia Razran Stone are accompanied by original, whimsical color illustrations by Katya Korobkina.

About Us

Russian Life is a publication of a 30-year-young, award-winning publishing house that creates a bimonthly magazine, books, maps, and other products for Russophiles the world over.

Latest Posts


Our Contacts

Russian Life
PO Box 567
Montpelier VT 05601-0567

800-639-4301
802-223-4955