February 17, 2020

What Seems to Be the Problem, Officer?



What Seems to Be the Problem, Officer?
"No, I don't know what you pulled me over." Alex 'Florstein' Fedorov, Wikimedia Commons

Moscow police last week stopped a BMW in Moscow's tony Rublyovka suburb. They found that the driver's license was expired, and that the man, whose name has not been released, had over 2,000 outstanding violations.

Two. Thousand.

After officers successfully extricated the man from his car and took him to the station, they found another 184 unpaid fines the driver had been evading, apparently with some skill.

Placed under detention for 7 days, he awaits trial. We suspect he will not be let off with a warning. Russia doesn't rank very well when it comes to road safety and could really use a win here.

 

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