June 30, 2021

The Rainbow Menace



The Rainbow Menace

“The demand for primitive toys suggests that not all of society, but a certain stratum, are inclined to simple decisions. Our society is approaching a situation where we will collapse into the abyss of simple solutions to complex issues.”

– Alexander Asmolov, Russian psychologist, politician, and head of the Department of Personality Psychology at Moscow State University

On June 28, the head of the Department of Personality Psychology at Moscow State University Alexander Asmolov – who is also a psychologist and politician – warned the Russian public of the malicious nature of the rather popular toy known as a “Simple-Dimples,” “Squishies,” or “Pop-its.”

The toy, which is regularly used in therapy for individuals with neurological disorders, has caught the attention of many a Russian child. Others fear that the often rainbow-colored items are gay propaganda.

 

 

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