February 15, 2021

Russian Government Goes Super Saiyan on Anime



Russian Government Goes Super Saiyan on Anime
No, this isn't Russia. But we were concerned about the internet rabbit holes leading from a search of pictures of anime, so we picked this photo. ElHeineken, Wikimedia commons

Here's a story that will make your edgy inner teenager storm out of the family room: a Russian court recently ruled that certain Anime series be banned from distribution in Russia.

The ruling, passed last month even as arguments to extend the measures continue, would pull Japanese series like "Death Note," "Tokyo Ghoul," and "Inuyashiki" from popular websites from which Russian teens tend to download episodes. Other anime, including the somewhat-more-mainstream "Naruto," are also under discussion to be banned.

Arguments for the measures center around their violent content, which some Russian parents and authorities say encourages similar violence among teens.

Fortunately, there's plenty of other stuff on the internet to fill your day. Just keep it G-rated.

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