January 15, 2022

(NOT) Morgenshtern


(NOT) Morgenshtern
Sounds like Russian Life has a bit of competition.  Photo by Okras via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 4.0

Russian rapper Morgenshtern is looking to disrupt the media industry by debuting his own media and news company cleverly titled “Not Morgenshtern.” 

The rapper announced this new business venture on his Instagram story explaining that he was uninspired by the current quality of the Russian language news he saw on the internet and wanted to produce something that could offer Russians more. Not only does he promise his readers hard-hitting news stories but also (and perhaps most importantly) memes

The project is still actively looking to hire members for pretty much every aspect of production (writers, editors, even “meme-models”), but that hasn’t stopped them from producing content already. You can get a taste for the style of writing that Morgenshtern is going after by scrolling through the new project’s Telegram page; most of the articles appear to be satirical takes on real news events, sort of like a Russian Onion but with more blatant sarcasm and memes. 

As for the unusual name of this side hustle, Morgenshtern wanted to be sure that his dubious connections to the Russian state (he recently left the country after being accused for supposed “drug charges” and is living in America indefinitely) wouldn’t get in the way of the young media company’s ability to publish. He promises that the name will help clear any connections he has to the company that of course, the top rapper himself is creating. 

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