August 05, 2022

Most Unstudious Sanctions


Most Unstudious Sanctions
There's no Tallinn what decision Estonia will make next. Flickr, Harshil Shah

The Estonian government has decided that Russians may no longer seek residency permits for educational purposes. Russians who wish to enter the country will be put through a much more arduous process.

Prior to Russia's Ukraine War, Russian citizens could enter Estonia wit a simple Schengen visa. Now, if a Russian is interested in entering the country for a temporary job, they must have a long-term Estonian visa.

According to the head of the Estonian Foreign Ministry Urmas Reinsalu, these new restrictions are meant to increase the pressure on Russia, with the hope of also improving Estonia's national security.

 

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