June 17, 2021

Moscow Metro Goes Big



Moscow Metro Goes Big
Linden trees like those soon to appear in Moscow Metro Square. Wikimedia Commons user Michal Klajban

Moscow has unveiled a new public green space to be named in honor of the metro system. It will be called Moscow Metro Square and will be located in the Sokolniki District.

The square will connect two others: Sokolnicheskaya Square and Sokolnicheskaya Zastava Square. Tens of thousands of people are expected to walk through the new square every day when it is completed. Linden trees and lanterns will accompany a recreation area.

The Moscow metro got its start in this district. Sokolniki Station was one of the first to be built and, in 1935, the first subway train departed from there.

In related metro news, the Big Circle Line – its second circle appearing on metro maps for the past few years and confusing unwitting tourists – is finally expected to open in 2022. It will be 70 kilometers (43 miles) long and will open with 31 stations, the largest circle line in the world.

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