May 03, 2021

A Refreshing Dip



A Refreshing Dip
That's not the Loch Ness Monster in this grainy video frame; just a Russian. VK account 63NEWS

Sometimes, you just have to force spring's hand. In a town still choked with sea ice and temperatures barely above freezing, one city employee is ready for warmer weather.

An Archangelsk worker was caught on camera swimming in a massive puddle last week, as his colleagues and onlookers watch. Among tarpaulins, construction equipment, and plenty of mud, a clip of the guy taking a dip, posted on Russian social media site VKontakte, has caused quite a stir.

The massive, urban lake is the product of the breaking of a massive municipal water pipe in the city, which is preventing a large portion of Archangelsk's population from using their sinks. While some go for a dip, other residents must visit water distribution stations to fill buckets. This Russian Michael Phelps is one of a number of workers sent to solve the problem.

We're sure swimming isn't helping improve the situation. We just hope he didn't pee in the pool.

Russians love to swim in holes, apparently: for a while, Moscow housed the world's largest outdoor swimming pool, also a massive construction site hole.

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