August 28, 2022

A Deadly Goal


A Deadly Goal
Russian soldiers in 2008, pulling out of Gori, Georgia. Flickr, Bohan_伯韩 Shen_沈

President Putin has signed a new decree to add another 137,000 troops to the armed forces in coming months. Prior to the invasion of Ukraine, Russia had over 900,000 active troops and another 2,000,000 in reserve. Currently, there are over a 1,000,000 military personnel and almost 900,000 civilian staff.

The new decree comes after many months of disappointing recruitment efforts. It turns out that not many Russian men are interested in joining the fight in Ukraine, and best estimates are that 70-80,000 Russian troops have been killed in what was supposed to be a quick, decisive war.

The decree will come into force January 1, but recruitment pushes have been underway for some time, including cash incentives and benefits for those who are incarcerated but have combat experience.

While Russia denies using conscripts in the war, the new decree does not clarify whether the new recruits will be volunteers or draftees.

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